Fairfax Virginia Reckless Driving Divorce DUI Traffic Child Custody Laws|Lawyer County

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Reckless driving in Virginia is a class 1 misdemeanor. How serious is a class 1 misdemeanor in Virginia. It is serious enough that it can land you in jail. Are you really going to jail for a reckless driving ticket in Virginia. The honest answer is that in most instances, no. But it is a possibility if you are not careful. Talk to a reckless driving lawyer in Virginia.
The SRIS Law Group defends clients charged with reckless driving regularly before the different traffic courts in Virginia.
Two of most regularly charged reckless driving offenses in Virginia are reckless driving by speed and reckless driving general.
Please seriously consider calling our firm if you have been charged with reckless driving in Virginia. We have client meeting locations in Fairfax, Richmond, Loudoun, Lynchburg, Fredericksburg, Prince William and Virginia Beach.

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Virginia 46.2-862 Reckless Driving Statute

§ 46.2-862. Exceeding speed limit.
A person shall be guilty of reckless driving who drives a motor vehicle on the highways in the Commonwealth (i) at a speed of twenty miles per hour or more in excess of the applicable maximum speed limit or (ii) in excess of eighty miles per hour regardless of the applicable maximum speed limit.
Virginia 46.2-852 Reckless Driving Statute
§ 46.2-852. Reckless driving; general rule.
Irrespective of the maximum speeds permitted by law, any person who drives a vehicle on any highway recklessly or at a speed or in a manner so as to endanger the life, limb, or property of any person shall be guilty of reckless driving.

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Virginia 46.2-865 Reckless Driving Statute

46.2-865. Racing; penalty.
Any person who engages in a race between two or more motor vehicles on the highways in the Commonwealth or on any driveway or premises of a church, school, recreational facility, or business property open to the public in the Commonwealth shall be guilty of reckless driving, unless authorized by the owner of the property or his agent. When any person is convicted of reckless driving under this section, in addition to any other penalties provided by law the driver’s license of such person shall be suspended by the court for a period of not less than six months nor more than two years. In case of conviction the court shall order the surrender of the license to the court where it shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions of § 46.2-398.

Most people are shocked that if you do donuts in a parking lot, you can be charged with reckless driving in Virginia. If you spin your tires, you can be charged with reckless driving in Virginia. Keep in mind that in Virginia, reckless driving is not a traffic offense. It is a criminal offense. Virginia has some of the strictest driving laws in the entire country. Be very careful about violating the different Virginia driving laws.

Talk to an experienced reckless driving lawyer who has gone before the different county traffic courts and knows how the different county traffic courts rule on reckless driving offenses.
Our Virginia traffic lawyers can and will do their best to help you. We are a simple phone call away.
As an added bonus, the following is a federal statute you might find relevant.

(a) In general
(1) Oral histories, preservation, and visitor services
There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to conduct oral histories and to carry out the preservation, interpretation, education, and other essential visitor services provided for by this subchapter.
(2) Artifacts
There are authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000 for the acquisition and curation of historical artifacts related to the park.
(b) Property acquisition
There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to acquire the properties listed in section 410ggg–1 (e)(2) of this title.
(c) Limitation on use of funds for S.S. RED OAK VICTORY
None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this section may be used for the operation, maintenance, or preservation of the vessel S.S. RED OAK VICTORY.
The following areas are hereby established as units of the National Park System and shall be administered by the Secretary under the laws governing the administration of such lands and under the provisions of this Act:
(1) Aniakchak National Monument, containing approximately one hundred and thirty-eight thousand acres of public lands, and Aniakchak National Preserve, containing approximately three hundred and seventy-six thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered ANIA–90,005, and dated October 1978. The monument and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the caldera and its associated volcanic features and landscape, including the Aniakchak River and other lakes and streams, in their natural state; to study, interpret, and assure continuation of the natural process of biological succession; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including, but not limited to, brown/grizzly bears, moose, caribou, sea lions, seals, and other marine mammals, geese, swans, and other waterfowl and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to interpret geological and biological processes for visitors. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the monument where such uses are traditional in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(2) Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, containing approximately two million four hundred and fifty-seven thousand acres of public land, as generally depicted on map numbered BELA–90,005, and dated October 1978. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect and interpret examples of arctic plant communities, volcanic lava flows, ash explosions, coastal formations, and other geologic processes; to protect habitat for internationally significant populations of migratory birds; to provide for archeological and paleontological study, in cooperation with Native Alaskans, of the process of plant and animal migration, including man, between North America and the Asian Continent; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including, but not limited to, marine mammals, brown/grizzly bears, moose, and wolves; subject to such reasonable regulations as the Secretary may prescribe, to continue reindeer grazing use, including necessary facilities and equipment, within the areas which on January 1, 1976, were subject to reindeer grazing permits, in accordance with sound range management practices; to protect the viability of subsistence resources; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to provide for outdoor recreation and environmental education activities including public access for recreational purposes to the Serpentine Hot Springs area. The Secretary shall permit the continuation of customary patterns and modes of travel during periods of adequate snow cover within a one-hundred-foot right-of-way along either side of an existing route from Deering to the Taylor Highway, subject to such reasonable regulations as the Secretary may promulgate to assure that such travel is consistent with the foregoing purposes.
(3) Cape Krusenstern National Monument, containing approximately five hundred and sixty thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered CAKR–90,007, and dated October 1979. The monument shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect and interpret a series of archeological sites depicting every known cultural period in arctic Alaska; to provide for scientific study of the process of human population of the area from the Asian Continent; in cooperation with Native Alaskans, to preserve and interpret evidence of prehistoric and historic Native cultures; to protect habitat for seals and other marine mammals; to protect habitat for and populations of, birds, and other wildlife, and fish resources; and to protect the viability of subsistence resources. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the monument in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(4)
(a) Gates of the Arctic National Park, containing approximately seven million fifty-two thousand acres of public lands, Gates of the Arctic National Preserve, containing approximately nine hundred thousand acres of Federal lands, as generally depicted on map numbered GAAR–90,011, and dated July 1980. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the wild and undeveloped character of the area, including opportunities for visitors to experience solitude, and the natural environmental integrity and scenic beauty of the mountains, forelands, rivers, lakes, and other natural features; to provide continued opportunities, including reasonable access, for mountain climbing, mountaineering, and other wilderness recreational activities; and to protect habitat for and the populations of, fish and wildlife, including, but not limited to, caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, and raptorial birds. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park, where such uses are traditional, in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(b) Congress finds that there is a need for access for surface transportation purposes across the Western (Kobuk River) unit of the Gates of the Arctic National Preserve (from the Ambler Mining District to the Alaska Pipeline Haul Road) and the Secretary shall permit such access in accordance with the provisions of this subsection.
(c) Upon the filing of an application pursuant to section 3164 (b) and (c) of this title for a right-of-way across the Western (Kobuk River) unit of the preserve, including the Kobuk Wild and Scenic River, the Secretary shall give notice in the Federal Register of a thirty-day period for other applicants to apply for access.
(d) The Secretary and the Secretary of Transportation shall jointly prepare an environmental and economic analysis solely for the purpose of determining the most desirable route for the right-of-way and terms and conditions which may be required for the issuance of that right-of-way. This analysis shall be completed within one year and the draft thereof within nine months of the receipt of the application and shall be prepared in lieu of an environmental impact statement which would otherwise be required under section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act [42 U.S.C. 4332 (2)(C)]. Such analysis shall be deemed to satisfy all requirements of that Act [42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.] and shall not be subject to judicial review. Such environmental and economic analysis shall be prepared in accordance with the procedural requirements of section 3164 (e) of this title. The Secretaries in preparing the analysis shall consider the following—
(i) Alternative routes including the consideration of economically feasible and prudent alternative routes across the preserve which would result in fewer or less severe adverse impacts upon the preserve.
(ii) The environmental and social and economic impact of the right-of-way including impact upon wildlife, fish, and their habitat, and rural and traditional lifestyles including subsistence activities, and measures which should be instituted to avoid or minimize negative impacts and enhance positive impacts.
(e) Within 60 days of the completion of the environmental and economic analysis, the Secretaries shall jointly agree upon a route for issuance of the right-of-way across the preserve. Such right-of-way shall be issued in accordance with the provisions of section 3167 of this title.
(5) Kenai Fjords National Park, containing approximately five hundred and sixty-seven thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered KEFJ–90,007, and dated October 1978. The park shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain unimpaired the scenic and environmental integrity of the Harding Icefield, its outflowing glaciers, and coastal fjords and islands in their natural state; and to protect seals, sea lions, other marine mammals, and marine and other birds and to maintain their hauling and breeding areas in their natural state, free of human activity which is disruptive to their natural processes. In a manner consistent with the foregoing, the Secretary is authorized to develop access to the Harding Icefield and to allow use of mechanized equipment on the icefield for recreation.
(6) Kobuk Valley National Park, containing approximately one million seven hundred and ten thousand acres of public lands as generally depicted on map numbered KOVA–90,009, and dated October 1979. The park shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the natural features of the Kobuk River Valley, including the Kobuk, Salmon, and other rivers, the boreal forest, and the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, in an undeveloped state; to protect and interpret, in cooperation with Native Alaskans, archeological sites associated with Native cultures; to protect migration routes for the Arctic caribou herd; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, moose, black and grizzly bears, wolves, and waterfowl; and to protect the viability of subsistence resources. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title. Except at such times when, and locations where, to do so would be inconsistent with the purposes of the park, the Secretary shall permit aircraft to continue to land at sites in the upper Salmon River watershed.
(7)
(a) Lake Clark National Park, containing approximately two million four hundred thirty-nine thousand acres of public lands, and Lake Clark National Preserve, containing approximately one million two hundred and fourteen thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered LACL–90,008, and dated October 1978. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To protect the watershed necessary for perpetuation of the red salmon fishery in Bristol Bay; to maintain unimpaired the scenic beauty and quality of portions of the Alaska Range and the Aleutian Range, including active volcanoes, glaciers, wild rivers, lakes, waterfalls, and alpine meadows in their natural state; and to protect habitat for and populations of fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, Dall sheep, brown/grizzly bears, bald eagles, and peregrine falcons.
(b) No lands conveyed to the Nondalton Village Corporation shall be considered to be within the boundaries of the park or preserve; if the corporation desires to convey any such lands, the Secretary may acquire such lands with the consent of the owner, and any such lands so acquired shall become part of the park or preserve, as appropriate. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park where such uses are traditional in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(8)
(a) Noatak National Preserve, containing approximately 6,477,168 acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered NOAT–90,004, and dated July 1980 and the map entitled “Noatak National Preserve and Noatak Wilderness Addition” dated September 1994. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the Noatak River and adjacent uplands within the preserve in such a manner as to assure the continuation of geological and biological processes unimpaired by adverse human activity; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including but not limited to caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, and for waterfowl, raptors, and other species of birds; to protect archeological resources; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to provide opportunities for scientific research. The Secretary may establish a board consisting of scientists and other experts in the field of arctic research in order to assist him in the encouragement and administration of research efforts within the preserve.
(b) All lands located east of centerline of the main channel of the Noatak River which are—
(1) within
(A) any area withdrawn under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act [43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.] for selection by the village of Noatak, and
(B) any village deficiency withdrawal under section 11(a)(3)(A) of such Act [43 U.S.C. 1610 (a)(3)(A)] which is adjacent to the area described in subparagraph (i) [1] of this paragraph,
(2) adjacent to public lands within a unit of the National Park System as designated under this Act, and
(3) not conveyed to such Village or other Native Corporation before the final conveyance date, shall, on such final conveyance date, be added to and included within, the adjacent unit of the National Park System (notwithstanding the applicable acreage specified in this paragraph) and managed in the manner provided in the foregoing provisions of this paragraph. For purposes of the preceding sentence the term “final conveyance date” means the date of the conveyance of lands under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act [43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.], or by operation of this Act, to the Village of Noatak, or to any other Native Corporation which completes the entitlement of such Village or other Corporation to conveyance of lands from the withdrawals referred to in subparagraph (1).
(9) Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park, containing approximately eight million one hundred and forty-seven thousand acres of public lands, and Wrangell-Saint Elias National Preserve, containing approximately four million one hundred and seventy-one thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered WRST–90,007, and dated August 1980. The park and preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain unimpaired the scenic beauty and quality of high mountain peaks, foothills, glacial systems, lakes, and streams, valleys, and coastal landscapes in their natural state; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife including but not limited to caribou, brown/grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, wolves, trumpeter swans and other waterfowl, and marine mammals; and to provide continued opportunities, including reasonable access for mountain climbing, mountaineering, and other wilderness recreational activities. Subsistence uses by local residents shall be permitted in the park, where such uses are traditional, in accordance with the provisions of subchapter II of chapter 51 of this title.
(10) Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, containing approximately one million seven hundred and thirteen thousand acres of public lands, as generally depicted on map numbered YUCH–90,008, and dated October 1978. The preserve shall be managed for the following purposes, among others: To maintain the environmental integrity of the entire Charley River basin, including streams, lakes and other natural features, in its undeveloped natural condition for public benefit and scientific study; to protect habitat for, and populations of, fish and wildlife, including but not limited to the peregrine falcons and other raptorial birds, caribou, moose, Dall sheep, grizzly bears, and wolves; and in a manner consistent with the foregoing, to protect and interpret historical sites and events associated with the gold rush on the Yukon River and the geological and paleontological history and cultural prehistory of the area. Except at such times when and locations where to do so would be inconsistent with the purposes of the preserve, the Secretary shall permit aircraft to continue to land at sites in the Upper Charley River watershed.

Our law firm assist clients in VA MD MA.
When a client is faced with a serious legal issue in Virginia, Maryland or Massachusetts, then they should serious consider calling the SRIS Law Group.

Our attorneys assist clients with the following types of legal issues:

•Criminal Defense
•Divorce
•Child Custody
•Traffic Defense
•Immigration
•Personal Injury

We have client meeting locations in Virginia, Maryland & Massachusetts.
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Our Fairfax County Criminal Lawyer attorneys and staff speak following languages – Tamil, Hindi, Telugu, Mandarin and Spanish.

Due to our experience in defending clients charged with the above types of legal issues, we routinely appear before the courts in Virginia, Maryland & Massachusetts.
Our attorneys are also licensed to appear in the federal district courts of Virginia, Maryland & Massachusetts.
If you need help with certain types of federal cases, please feel free to call us and discuss your legal issue with us.

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